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2017


Quintin Gonzalez / Denver, CO

In the piece "A Fool's Fire and Fury," I have created a visual response to the looming possibilities of nuclear war. The image I am submitting imagines the absolute horror of that possibility. I wanted to create an image that functions as something that is an omen and cautionary to others. As this has not occurred, I felt that giving this piece a dream like quality that is reminiscent of the hellish artworks of the pre-modern era found in the 19th century would be my best way to communicate the visual narrative for this artwork which is indeed foreboding.


Quintin Gonzalez, "A Fool's Fire and Fury," Light-jet print on photo paper, 10" x 39," 2017, gift of artist
       
 

Wesam Mazhar Haddad / Brooklyn, NY "Jordanian Origin"

Simplicity is the highest level of complexity; Complexity is the highest level of simplicity.

Fact: More than 12,000 children have reportedly been killed so far as a result of the Syrian civil war and the number is increasing rapidly.

Dedicated to "Aylan Kurdi" the 3 years old Syrian boy that was found dead on the beach.

Disclaimer: *No babies were harmed in the making of this poster. They are just being tortured to death RIGHT NOW by the cradle of wars...



Wesam Mazhar Haddad, "Cradle of Tortured Peace," Digital Printing on Paper. 100 cm X 70 cm, 2016, gift of artist
       
 


Jim Kransberger / Asheville, NC

"Gerrymandering" is the biggest obstacle to genuine democracy in the United States," so says the Washington Post.

This piece is an iteration of the old, hand-held "slider game," all the pieces are equal in all respects and mirror every other piece: five blue and five red inhabitants . . . and quite naive. The result is that this political game, cannot be corrupted, no one can cause a corrupt result. Unless, of course, someone does not exercise their vote, or someone gets to vote who has no standing. A gallery owner has said that my work has "good narrative." I certainly hope so because without some sort of narrative, something to say, why bother to make anything? If the narrative grows too deep or weighty, then it gets abstract and loses both clarity and worth. If it needs a wordy clarification and/or wordy explanation, then it has missed its' own point.


 


I think Mary Fischer, a nationally known ceramic sculptor, was the one who opined something like: ". . . long artist statements tend to make liars out of all artists."

"Gerrymandering" is a comment on the methodology and sport of disenfranchising a political opponent and . . . a not-so-fair game.

Jim Kransberger, "Gerrymandering," Mixed Media, 7.5" x 21" x 21," 2016, gift of artist
       
 

Amy Mack / Durango, CO - LA, CA

"Barcode Lye Soap" is a political portrait from Amy Mack's on-going Barcode Painting Series (began: in Los Angeles, spring of 2000) that addresses consumer trends and everyday products that touch our lives. She describes barcodes as the "common denominator of mountains, a river winding through the town ... all have heightened her environmental consciousness and made a clear impression on new works: aspen trees segmented by barcode patterns that represent industry and the effect consumerism has on the health of our planet, as well as segmented cairn balance rocks, accounts of the Gold King Mine spill, clouds and red earth barcodes, on canvas and new media.

"Barcode Lye Soap" is rare in that it is one of the few portraits created in her barcode series. Inspired by the events leading to the election of America's 45th President and observations of his general dishonesty with no real care for what is or is not true, Mack's barcode work has since taken on a political voice that she says "speaks for me when I have run out of words." Her choice in selecting the barcode from a common brand of lye soap can be interpreted in many ways. For example, in America there is a saying that when someone tells lies and says thoughtless things, their mouth should be "washed out with soap." Another saying "getting up on a soapbox" refers to politicians who would make impromptu speeches while standing on a raised platform such as a wooden crate, or soapbox.



Amy Mack, "Barcode Lye Soap," Art print on heavyweight archival matte paper, 20" x 16"
2016, gift of artist
       
 

Ed Outhouse / Joplin, MO

"Backyard Dog Show, Oscar Grant 2009" is part of a posters series focused on police brutality in the United States. The poster includes an appropriated illustration by Amos Sewell for The Saturday Evening Post. The title of Sewell's illustration, "Backyard Dog Show" serves as the typography in the design and is included in the poster title along with the name and date of a person subjected to police brutality. However, in this context Sewell's title is open to new interpretations and meanings. Combining illustrations from The Saturday Evening Post with cell phone photos and video screen grabs of people subjected to police brutality creates a strong visual and conceptual contrast intended to push the viewer to consider the broader implications of this complex and difficult subject. In this case, Oscar Grant was lying face down on the ground when he was shot in the back by a San Francisco Metro Police Officer. Oscar died from his injuries soon after and his death is the subject of the 2013 film "Fruitvale Station".

"Dance Cotillion, Timothy Russell and Malissa Williams 2012" is part of a posters series focused on police brutality in the United States. The poster includes an appropriated illustration by Amos Sewell for The Saturday Evening Post. The title of Sewell's illustration, "Dance Cotillion" serves as the typography in the design and is included in the poster title along with the names and date of people subjected to police brutality. However, in this context Sewell's title is open to new interpretations and meanings. Combining illustrations from The Saturday Evening Post with cell phone photos and video screen grabs of people subjected to police brutality creates a strong visual and conceptual contrast intended to push the viewer to consider the broader implications of this complex and difficult subject. In this case, Timothy Russell and Malissa Williams were in a car when the muffler backfired as they passed local police in East Cleveland, OH. Mistaking the noise of the backfiring muffler for gunshots, police immediately engaged in pursuit of their car. 137 shots were fired during the chase which resulted in the deaths of Russell and Williams.



Ed Outhouse, "Backyard Dog Show, Oscar Grant 2009," Digital Collage, 16" x 24, "2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ed Outhouse, "Dance Cotillion, Timothy Russell & Malissa Williams 2012," Digital Collage,
16 x 24," 2015
       
 


Charles Andrew Seaton / San Diego, CA

The motivation for this work was satire. It is part of a political body of work that was inspired by an excerpt from one of Shakespeare's works,

"All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances..."

It was completed during the presidential campaign of 2016 and reflects what I felt at that time. I am a registered Republican and have been disgusted with Trump ever since he began his campaign in the summer of 2015. I never voted for Obama, but now wish I had. The 2016 presidential campaign forced me to reevaluate where I stood on many issues in both fiscal and social spheres. During the campaigns I read Adolf Hitler's 'Mein Kampf' and saw many parallels between actions and words described on those pages with what I saw on television from Donald Trump.


Andrew Seaton,
"Dr. Evil,"
(2/8) Photoshop and google images, 10" x 17," 2016, gift of artist
       
 

Naandeyé García Villegas / Mexico City, Mexico

 

Migrant woman: here or there, you have rights.

 

 

Naandeyé García Villegas, "Migrant Woman," Digital illustration, 6" x 24," 2017, gift of artist
       

2016

     

 

Armin Amirian / Esfahan, Iran

All the contradictions that are linked and have co-existence. Where the utilization and operation tools of achieving the objectives and goals of the regimes are "the thoughts and the minds". Additional production; Religion producing; Child birth; all that is a sign of the contrast between dream and reality, and an image of life as a small part of a whole.



Armin Amirian, "Gelofen-02", 2014, Photography, 100x70 cm, gift of artist
       
 

Wesam Mazhar Haddad / Los Angeles, CA (Jordanian Orgin)

Fact: The adult human body averaged is 65% of water.

Concept: How many drops of water have been and still draining out for nothing This is nothing but the ugly truth of our daily consumption of
water. A rusted future where it is out of water but full of tears. Someday, there will be no water but our tears.

Explanation: By replacing metaphorically the human eye with a plughole of a sink, I have quod erat demonstrandum the image of water consumption of the past and the current present, echoing away in a single tear (drop of water) into the rusted future of mankind. Hours of collective photo manipulation and retouching took place to give birth to the final outcome. Every single element was studied separately and carefully. The typographic characters for example were composed differently; every letter was altered from the rest of its peers to make it randomly realistic and naturally rusted.

Wesam Mazhar Haddad,
"Rusted Tears Poster," 2016, Digital Printing on Paper, 100x70cm, gift of artist
       

2015

     

 

Martin Blanco / Canillo, Andorra

"Modern society is getting more and more global; a phenomenon closely linked to the rise of the Internet. Thanks to this new phenomenon, those who previously did not have access to the traditional media now had a public forum for their opinions.

All kinds of blogs began to appear where people commented, argued, expounded, and offered criticism on all sorts of issues, and gradually, the information was decentralized.

Newly born online social networks are social structures composed of groups of people who are connected by one or more types of relationships, such as friendship, kinship, common interests, or shared knowledge.

From this time on, nothing is the same. People find a place to express their views, interacting with people across the planet with distances now measured in mouse clicks.

We are immersed in the twenty-first century as thirsty bodies to give and receive feedback, without even being entirely sure whether we have anything to say.

And the main tool to make that feedback come true is the smartphone. A complex tool which compiles lots of things in the same device. And now it seems we live through that device.

We increasingly feel more alone, living virtual lives with virtual friends. Meanwhile, we observe through our windows what really goes on in real life."

"A permanent dose" 2014, Digital print on German Etching Hahnemühle 300 gsm paper. Limited edition of 25, 19 x 28, gift of artist
       

 

Sabrina DeTurk / Philadelphia, PA

"What do you think of Iran?" Depending on context, this question could be posed as an academic inquiry, for political reasons or just out of idle curiosity. In my case, it was asked by a customs officer as I was waiting to be fingerprinted at Tehran's Imam Khomeini International Airport in April 2015. Given the context, I was a bit concerned that there might actually be a "right" answer and that I was in serious danger of not providing it.

I mumbled something non-committal about not entirely knowing what to think and that I was traveling to Iran to learn more. At that point, I was taken away for fingerprinting and after a few anxious moments listening to conversations in Farsi, some papers were stamped, my passport was returned and I was officially a visitor to Iran.

About 1000 - 1500 Americans visit Iran each year, though with the recent thaw in diplomatic relations and a major push by President Hassan Rouhani to increase tourism, that number is expected to rise over the next few years. But the country still remains shrouded in secrecy for most Americans – a kind of black box whose contents we can speculate about but of which we have little solid knowledge. I am of the generation that was just about old enough to grasp the enormity of the Iranian hostage crisis as it was happening and that event colored – or, more appropriately, shadowed – my view of the country growing up.

One of the defining features of life in Iran for both local women and tourists is the mandatory hijab, or headscarf, which must be worn in public at all times. The all black garment called a chador, which some women choose to wear, is not, contrary to many Westerners' perceptions, a required garment, but a personal choice (in some very religious settings such as shrines or mosques all women are required to put on the chador and they are available to


borrow at such locations). The women who choose the chador are referred to as "chadori" and the term is used in a derogatory manner by those women who opt only to wear the hijab and often would prefer to go without a head covering altogether. Many Iranian women push the limits of what is required in terms of hijab and wear very lightweight, colorful scarves pushed far back on their heads. This has given rise to the concept of "good" versus "bad" hijab, with more conservative women and men commenting on how well a woman's hijab conforms to traditional expectations for modesty.

As I traveled through Tehran, I became fascinated by this variety of interpretations of hijab and chador and tried to capture the way in which women make these garments a personal statement. This photograph offers a glimpse of those statements.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Headscarf and Motorbike, 2015, Digital print on fine art paper, 24 x 34", gift of artist
       

 

Wesam Mazhar Haddad / during 2015 resides in Doha, Qatar / Country of Origin - Jordan

Inspiration: Suspension bridges, high-rise buildings, huge resorts, undergoing rapidly development in Jordan. Nevertheless, we still deforesting the green, consuming matchsticks and abuse it! What a Parallel Equation! Revelation comes across in any sort. It comes as a heartache consideration for the unstopping desertification in my homeland, as a stroke admiration for a Jackson Pollock's painting, or as a haphazard combination between a hairbrush and useless matchsticks.

Concept: One tree makes a million matchsticks; one matchstick burns a million trees.

Substances: Worthless left over matchstick was the main afflatus in this work. Every single entity of a matchstick stands out as a unique character, a piece of art. It resembles a shape of a living being (Tree).

Process: A composition out of matchsticks was a complicated project. Working with such fragile and sensitive elements was a huge challenge. Thousands of matchsticks used to accomplish these visuals. A small blow, unintended move could destroy days of working.

Matchsticks Forest, 2006
Printing on Paper, 100cm x 70cm, gift of artist

 

 

 

 

 

 


Matchsticks Forest, 2006
Printing on Paper, 100cm x 70cm, gift of artist

 

 

 

   

2014

     

 

Armin Amirian / Isfahan, Iran

When even a fragile flower is able to explode a rock and burst out to behold by breeze, rain, and sun, the world is a sacred temple.
We are not weaker than the tiny flower.
We are great and sacred.
We are undeniable truth.

Ahmad Shamloo (Iranian contemporary poet )

Armin Amirian
"Abattoir 1" 20"x16" digital image
gift of artist
       
 

Stuart South / New Orleans, LA

My compulsion to create art comes from deep with in me. I have always been very optimistic, jovial, and in pursuit of freedom. To me these are important ingredients on the path of creation. I always hope to add something to the universe.
I think I decided to be an artist around three or four years of age after Mr. Rogers told me from my television that in an artist's world trees can be blue or what ever color you want. That's the world for me, the world of the mind, and my paintings are the residue of these events of creation. Much of my art is inspired by media, both mass and obscure. When I create a painting I like the familiarity of iconic images, but it excites me to see them re-imagined.
I love that each art object I create will have it's own life. It will live and interact with people. As all physical object do, it will slowly change, grow old, and eventually die. I try to spend a lot of time with each piece so that my energy will become embedded in them. I use tinny brushes even on large fields of uniform color. This gives me more time to push little pieces of my soul down into the paint. I often wonder about the lives these objects live when I let go of them. It brings me great pleasure to send my work out onto the stormy seas like bottles carrying messages.

Start South, "Device Designed to Destroy Human Beings" 12"x 9" Acrylic on Canvas, 2014
gift of artist

 

       
 

Nectarios Stamatopoulos / Athens Greece

Lives and works in Athens and London. With background studies in Graphic design and Multimedia Arts production he works as a professional visual artist. He has exhibited in museums, galleries and institutions in Greece, Cyprus, France, Germany, USA and the U.K. and his work has been featured in local and international print and online publications.
Works also as an illustrator and designer for print and corporate clients and regularly teaches drawing in seminars and workshops.

Using drawing as his favorite medium and with a cross disciplinary use of contemporary media he creates works expressing and exploring ideas about the essence of human condition in the contemporary urban environment. Incorporating drawing, painting, photography, installation, digital art, small press zines and comic art, and with found materials from a variety of sources ranging from old photographs, ephemera printed matter, comics art iconography and art history references, he creates narratives challenging the perception of beauty in the decay of urban landscape. His work contrasts the high and the low, the banal and the obvious, the awesome and the trivial, the tranquil and the hectic. Personal mark making, travelling and psycho geography, pop surrealism, art history and urban mythology are reoccurring motifs used as elements of a symbolic portraiture of contemporary urban life. Much of this output

Nectarios Stamatopoulos, "Monument for a market" 21 x 29 cm, ink & acrylic on paper, 2013, gift of artist
       

2013

     

 

Carrie A. Dyer / High Point NC

the work is created through reoccurring patterns of thought through the repetition of daily interactions. the imagery is dissected from childlike states of isolation, an in-ability to communicate traditionally, being misunderstood. parts and pieces of animals reference icon like objects which play as psychological metaphors. the wing is essential for the bird to fly; antlers are essential for the deer to protect. metaphorical icons are juxtaposed next to the simulation of water like area-scapes frozen in some kind of time. size reflects the intimacy of the psychological space, the moment, the idea that even thought is meaningless due to thew short inconsistent nature of existence itself. the act of organizing these thoughts creates a formula of understanding. "things that weren't supposed to happen" reflects a childlike perspective of everyday events that shatter an idealistic view of how society should be. the work is a reaction to this realization. it is a silent scream, an emotion that creates an inability to react physically. small areas create catalysts for hopefulness where seemingly insignificant actions create the ability to see as you might not have seen before.

The theme "thing's that weren't supposed to happen" is central to all of my work conceptually. My work is based on personal experiences –the idealistic view from a child's perspective. Icons and ideologies collide with the realistic view of how and what the world is. Iconic objects are used as metaphor. Through these juxtapositions abstract landscapes are created. Using the idea of time as a point of origin allows, me as the maker, to use materials like transparency, and the appearance of water-like area-scapes.

There are many different ways that people express the same emotions and psychological states. The techniques and mediums chosen have an impact on how the viewer decodes and interprets the work. My personal work includes a variety of different media. From painting, drawing, photography, illustration, construction, digital prints, fibers, video, inflatables to graphic design, all areas are connected to each other and represent methods of communication. All of these media are significant to my process as a graphic designer and artist.
Constructed Reality, digital print 2013


The use of techniques such as layering Plexiglas and transparencies allow me to work in layers. These techniques mimic the characteristics of water. Layers create a three-dimensional effect and cast shadows on the wall. I have also used water in my work –from encasing water in resin to using a motor to create a kinetic piece creating a funnel in the water. Water can be interpreted as a metaphorical icon in many ways. I see my work as research of questions that can't be answered. Unstoppable forces meet unmovable objects. My work is a tool through which I communicate indescribable emotions too painful to put into words. I expect the viewer to have their own interpretations of the work just as there are many different interpretations of visual language.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Carrie A. Dyer, "Constructed Reality," digital print, 2013, gift of artist
       
 

 

 
 
       
     
 
       
 

 

 
 
       
 

 

 
 
       
     
 
       
 

 

 
 
       
 

 

 
 
       
 

 

 
 
       
 

 

 
 
       
       
       
       

 

 

 

 

 

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FL3TCH3R Exhibit Collection